2021 Q&As

FWF Q&A: Susan Johnson

FWF Q&A: Susan Johnson

Susan Johnson has been writing books since 1985, when she received the first of three grants from the Literature Board of the Australia Council which allowed her to write full time. She has since written award-winning novels, memoir and essays. From Where I Fell is a...

read more
FWF Q&A: Sam Van Zweden

FWF Q&A: Sam Van Zweden

Sam Van Zweden is a Melbourne-based writer interested in memory, food, mental health and the body. Her book Eating WIth My Mouth Open won the 2019 KYD Unpublished Manuscript Award. Is there a moment you recall that shaped your own idea of feminism? There have been so...

read more
FWF Q&A: Randa Abdel-Fattah

FWF Q&A: Randa Abdel-Fattah

Award-winning writer Randa Abdel-Fattah is one of Australia's most compelling cultural critics. Her book Coming of Age in the War on Terror, interrogates the impact of living in a post 9/11 world on young people's political consciousness and their trust towards adults...

read more
FWF Q&A: Leanne Hall

FWF Q&A: Leanne Hall

Leanne Hall is an award winning author of young adult and children’s fiction. The Gaps is a moving examination of vulnerability and strength, safety and danger, and the particular uncertainties young women face in the world. What does feminism mean to you? My own...

read more
FWF Q&A: Josephine Taylor

FWF Q&A: Josephine Taylor

Josephine Taylor is a writer and editor. She is Associate Editor at Westerly Magazine and an Adjunct Senior Lecturer in Writing at Edith Cowan University. Her debut novel Eye of a Rook investigates the history of hysteria, female sexuality and the treatment...

read more

2020 Q&As

Q&A: Yolande Strengers

Q&A: Yolande Strengers

Yolande Strengers is a digital sociologist and human-computer interaction scholar investigating the sustainability and gender effects of digital, emerging and smart technologies. Her book, The Smart Wife, written with Jenny Kennedy, examines the emergence of digital...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Laura La Rosa

FWF2020 Q&A: Laura La Rosa

Laura La Rosa is an FWF2020 panelist on Being Feminist, Staying Bold. Laura is a proud Darug woman, published writer, emerging critic and graphic designer. She has been heavily involved in a number of grassroots activist initiatives, and numerous ongoing projects that...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Sally Goldner

FWF2020 Q&A: Sally Goldner

Sally Goldner is part of the FWF2020 ThinkIn Intersections of the Law. Her twenty-year-plus involvement in Victoria’s LGBTIQA+ communities include Transgender Victoria, co-facilitating Trans family, 3CR’s Out of the Pan and Bisexual Alliance Victoria Treasurer. She...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Fernanda Dahlstrom

FWF2020 Q&A: Fernanda Dahlstrom

Fernanda Dahlstrom is a FWF2020 panelist on Intersections of the Law.Fernanda is a writer, editor and lawyer. She has worked as a solicitor in criminal law, family law, child protection law and domestic violence law in the Northern Territory and Queensland. Her...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Nicole Lee

FWF2020 Q&A: Nicole Lee

Nicole Lee is a FWF2020 panelist on Our Culture of Violence. Nicole is a family violence survivor, passionate public advocate and previous member of Victoria’s first Victim Survivors’ Advisory Council. Is there a moment you recall that shaped your own idea of...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Raelee Lancaster

FWF2020 Q&A: Raelee Lancaster

Raelee Lancaster speaks on Feminism for All, as a part of our FWFTalks podcast series. Raelee is a writer, collaborator, creative producer and co-director of the National Young Writers Festival and was the recipient of a Copyright Agency First Nations Fellowship...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Enza Gandolfo

FWF2020 Q&A: Enza Gandolfo

Enza is a panelist on the FWF2020 Craftivism session.She is a writer and the author of two novels, Swimming (shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis Prize) and The Bridge (shortlisted for the Stella Prize 2019), as well as the co-author of several...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Alice Robinson

FWF2020 Q&A: Alice Robinson

Alice Robinson speaks on Ecofeminism, as a part of our FWFTalks podcast series.Her debut novel, Anchor Point, was long-listed for the Stella Prize and the Indie Book Awards. The Glad Shout was shortlisted for an Aurealis Award and The Colin Roderick Literary Award...

read more
FWF2020 Q&A: Inga Simpson

FWF2020 Q&A: Inga Simpson

Inga Simpson speaks on Ecofeminism in our FWFTalks podcast series. Inga is the author of Understory: a life with trees, which was shortlisted for the Adelaide Writers Week Award for Nonfiction, as well as the novels Where the Trees...

read more

2019 Q&As

FWF Q&A: Anna Krien

FWF Q&A: Anna Krien

Anna Krien is the author of Act of Grace. What does feminism mean to you?  To me, feminism means keeping your eye in. So much of our everyday life is based on assumptions about gender roles, be it in work, politics, education, play or love, and with each stage of...

read more
FWF Q&A: Madison Griffiths

FWF Q&A: Madison Griffiths

Madison Griffiths is a writer, poet, artist and host of Tender. What does feminism mean to you? It means disobedience, but the best possible kind. Feminism is a conversation, a response to being left out of the discourse. It allows for women’s voices, bodies and needs...

read more
FWF Q&A: Jess Hill

FWF Q&A: Jess Hill

Jess Hill is the author of See What You Made Me Do What does feminism mean to you? To me, feminism is about sustainability. It’s not just about gaining equality in a patriarchal world – it’s about exposing the patriarchy as a destructive and ridiculous system, not...

read more
FWF Q&A: Nicola Redhouse

FWF Q&A: Nicola Redhouse

Nicola Redhouse is the author of Unlike the Heart. What does feminism mean to you? For me feminism means a constant awareness and push against structures and systems, attitudes, biases (often unconscious) and cultures that deny women the ability to make choices for...

read more
FWF Q&A: Alice Whitmore

FWF Q&A: Alice Whitmore

Alice Whitmore is a Melbourne-based writer and academic, the translator of Guillermo Fadanelli and Mariana Dimópulos, and an editor at Cordite Poetry Review. What does feminism mean to you? Feminism to me is a collective spirit of love and strength. Feminism...

read more
FWF Q&A: Monica Tan

FWF Q&A: Monica Tan

Former Guardian journalist and Greens politician Monica Tan is the author of Stranger Country. What does feminism mean to you? Feminism to me means being conscious that my womanhood is a frame through which I have both experienced the world, and been regarded by the...

read more
FWF Q&A: Hella Ibrahim

FWF Q&A: Hella Ibrahim

Hella Ibrahim is the founding editor of Djed Press, an online publication that provides a paid platform for creators of colour. What does feminism mean to you? I have a poster on my wall at home that reads: What are you doing to make things better? I look at...

read more
FWF Q&A: Louise Swinn

FWF Q&A: Louise Swinn

Louise Swinn is the editor of Choice Words, a new collection of writing about abortion. What does feminism mean to you? Feminism is really simple for me. It just means that women of all ages and colours and shapes and sizes should be treated with the same respect and...

read more
FWF Q&A: Sonia Orchard

FWF Q&A: Sonia Orchard

Sonia Orchard's novel, Into the Fire, explores power, guilt and womanhood, and the many ways that we betray one another as well as our own ideals. What does feminism mean to you? Oooh tricky! Once upon a time I’d have simply said equal pay, equal rights, equal...

read more

2018 Q&As

FWF Q&A: Alison Whittaker

FWF Q&A: Alison Whittaker

Alison Whittaker's new collection, Blakwork, is out now. What does feminism mean to you? Matriarchy — a fundamental restructuring of how we relate to one another, how we make and break institutions, and how we respond to and take responsibility for Country, mob and...

read more
Q&A: Hilary Rogers

Q&A: Hilary Rogers

This month we speak to writer and publisher Hilary Rogers, whose debut Girltopia is bringing feminism to children's fiction. What does feminism mean to you? Feminism is simply equal rights for women and girls. And by this I mean equal opportunities, equal pay, equal...

read more
FWF Q&A: Zoya Patel

FWF Q&A: Zoya Patel

Zoya Patel's memoir, No Country Woman, explores questions of identity and belonging through an Australian-Fijian-Indian lens. What does feminism mean to you? Feminism has meant many different things to me throughout my life. It has been a belief system, an identifier,...

read more
FWF Q&A: Leah Jing McIntosh

FWF Q&A: Leah Jing McIntosh

In the hottest this month, Liminal founder and editor Leah Jing McIntosh. What does feminism mean to you? To me, feminism means an equality, which encompasses all intersections. As Flavia Dzodan writes, my feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit.  Was...

read more
FWF Q&A: Bri Lee

FWF Q&A: Bri Lee

Writer and editor Bri Lee's debut memoir, Eggshell Skull, explores sexism in the legal system alongside her own personal story of seeking justice. What does feminism mean to you? Equality regardless of gender, and therefore fighting for everyone to enjoy the benefits...

read more
FWF Q&A: Sophie Beer

FWF Q&A: Sophie Beer

We're talking to illustrator and children's author Sophie Beer, whose book Love Makes A Family and series Pups are out now. Photo: Kirsty Sycz What does feminism mean to you? Equality, but also with a recognition that sometimes that necessitates lifting up! The...

read more
FWF Q&A: Jamie Marina Lau

FWF Q&A: Jamie Marina Lau

This month, we speak to Jamie Marina Lau, author of Pink Mountain on Locust Island. What does feminism mean to you? Feminism is undoing inequality. Was there a particular moment you can pinpoint that was crucial to the development of your perspective on feminism, and...

read more
FWF Q&A: Louise Omer

FWF Q&A: Louise Omer

Each month, we interview an Australian writer about feminism, writing and the connections between the two. This month, we speak to Louise Omer – writer, critic and author of the upcoming book Holy Woman, about women and religion. Photo: Bri Hammond What does...

read more
FWF Q&A: Alison Evans

FWF Q&A: Alison Evans

Alison Evans is the author of Ida. What does feminism mean to you? For me, I think feminism is about a drive to be better. It's about learning ways you and systems hurt people, and how we can do better.   Was there a particular moment you can pinpoint that was crucial...

read more

2017 Q&As

FWF Q&A: Sarah Krasnostein

FWF Q&A: Sarah Krasnostein

This month, we speak to Sarah Krasnostein, author of The Trauma Cleaner. What does feminism mean to you? For me, feminism is an orientation which is sensitive to the ways in which dominant social, economic, legal and political norms devalue, silence and kill (yes,...

read more
FWF Q&A: Odette Kelada

FWF Q&A: Odette Kelada

For October's Q&A, we speak to Odette Kelada, the author of Drawing Sybylla. What does feminism mean to you?   Equality. It’s as simple as that for me. Feminism is survival. Was there a particular moment you can pinpoint that was crucial to the development of your...

read more
FWF Q&A: Amal Awad

FWF Q&A: Amal Awad

Each month, we interview an Australian writer about feminism, writing, and the connections between the two. In our first Q&A, we speak to Sydney-based writer and journalist Amal Awad, whose latest book is Beyond Veiled Cliches: The Real Lives of Arab Women. What...

read more