Workshop: Writing Life, Writing Self (Melbourne)

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Writers are often told to ‘write what you know’, but finding an authentic voice to tell personal stories can be a challenging task. For women writing about their lives, these challenges are often multiplied by the gendered expectations and obstacles that writing memoir presents.

In this intensive workshop, freelance writer, appearance activist and feminist Carly Findlay shares practical tips and personal advice about life-writing. Discover your ideal memoir voice; draw on your personal experiences to create an authentic narrative; discuss the personal and political act of writing while female; and explore the practicalities of honing, finessing, editing and pitching personal writing.

Participants will be required to bring a story idea or outline to share in the workshop.


Writing Life, Writing Self
Sunday 1 October, 9.30am-12.30pm
Queen Victoria Women’s Centre
210 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne VIC
Tickets are $75 ($65 concession) – buy now

This venue is wheelchair accessible.

This workshop is open to women and non-binary writers. The maximum workshop capacity is 18 people.

Two free places at this workshop are reserved for writers experiencing financial difficulty. To express your interest in taking one of these places, please email us with a short statement (no more than 200 words) about why you wish to attend the workshop.


About the facilitator
Carly Findlay is an award-winning writer, speaker and appearance activist. She has the rare, severe skin condition called ichthyosis, and writes on disability issues for publications including ABC, Daily Life and SBS. She was named as one of Australia’s most influential women in the 2014 Australian Financial Review and Westpac 100 Women of Influence Awards, and has appeared on ABC’s You Can’t Ask That and Cyberhate with Tara Moss. She is currently writing her first book – a memoir – to be published by Harper Collins in 2018. Read her writing on appearance diversity and disability at carlyfindlay.com.au

Workshop: Feminist Opinion Writing (Melbourne)

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Got plenty of opinions, but need a hand expressing them? Join columnist Van Badham for this intensive workshop to learn all about crafting, writing and pitching strong feminist op-eds.

Learn how to funnel and finesse your passion and ideas into a compelling op-ed; identify the appropriate audience for your opinion writing; explore the art of pitching to publications that will amplify the impact of your piece; and discuss the personal and political act of writing while female.


Feminist Opinion Writing
Sunday 1 October, 1.30pm-4.30pm
Queen Victoria Women’s Centre
210 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne VIC
Tickets are $75 ($65 concession) – buy now

This venue is wheelchair accessible.

This workshop is open to women and non-binary writers. The maximum workshop capacity is 18 people.

Two free places at this workshop are reserved for writers experiencing financial difficulty. To express your interest in taking one of these places, please email us with a short statement (no more than 200 words) about why you wish to attend the workshop.


About the facilitator
Van Badham is a writer, commentator, activist, occasional broadcaster, theatremaker and one of Australia’s most controversial public intellectuals. In addition to a weekly column for Guardian Australia, her work has appeared in The AgeAustralian CosmopolitanDaily LifeSoutherly, Women’s Agenda,Britain’s Daily Telegraph and in anthologies for UQP, Hardie Grant and Monash University Press. She is a frequent guest on panels for ABC’s Radio National, The Drum and Q and A, Channel 7’s Sunrise, the All About Women festival and The Festival of Dangerous Ideas. As a playwright, her work has been performed across Australia and internationally. Her first novel, Burnt Snow, was published by Pan Macmillan in 2010. She is active on Twitter via @vanbadham.

Giving Up the Good Girl (Canberra)

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With 2017 the unofficial Year of the Nasty Woman, join us to discuss how expectations for women are changing, how we are challenging and rejecting gender roles, and learning to give up being so damn nice. Hear from three amazing creative women from different fields, about how they and their work have been politicised and criticised – but also applauded.

Featuring Shu-Ling Chua and Rosanna Stevens, and chaired by FWF’s own Louise Taylor.

Giving Up the Good Girl
Sunday 22 October, 3-4pm
Muse, East Hotel
69 Canberra Ave, Kingston ACT
Tickets $10 – buy now


About the panel

Shu-Ling Chua has written for FeminartsyPeril MagazineSeizureThe Lifted BrowPencilled In and other publications and was highly commended in the Feminartsy Memoir Prize 2017. She tweets @hellopollyanna and was previously producer of Noted Writers Festival and Voiceworks nonfiction editor. You can read more of her writing here.

Rosanna Stevens is a writer, humourist and performer based in Canberra. Her publication credits include The Toast, The BelladonnaGriffith Review and The Believer, and her writing on menstruation can be found in ArcherDoing it (UQP) and in this year’s Best of The Lifted Brow. She is the 2016 Anne Edgeworth Fellow. Say hi sometime on Twitter: @rosannabeatrice

Louise Taylor is a proud Kamilaroi woman, a lawyer and the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid ACT. Louise is passionate about access to justice for, and the empowerment of, Aboriginal women, and is currently a member of the Law Council of Australia’s Indigenous Legal Issues Committee and an associate of UNSW’s Indigenous Law Centre. She is also a member of the Feminist Writers Festival board. You can find her at @MsLou27

With thanks to Muse for venue support

Workshop: Writing Life, Writing Self (Canberra)

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Writers are often told to ‘write what you know’, but telling personal stories in a way that resonates broadly can be a challenging task. For women writing about their lives, these challenges are often multiplied by the gendered expectations and obstacles that writing memoir presents.

In this intensive workshop, author and editor Jessica Friedmann shares practical tips and personal advice about life-writing, memoir, and what it means to tell your own story. Draw on your personal experiences to create a well-honed narrative; discuss the personal and political act of writing while female; and explore the practicalities of finessing, editing and pitching personal writing.

Participants will be required to bring a story idea or outline to share in the workshop.


Writing Life, Writing Self
Sunday 8 October2.00–5.00pm
Muse, East Hotel
69 Canberra Ave, Kingston ACT
Tickets are $75 ($65 concession) – buy now

This venue is wheelchair accessible.

This workshop is open to women and non-binary writers. The maximum workshop capacity is 18 people.


About the facilitator

Jessica Friedmann is a writer and editor living in Canberra. A graduate of the University of Melbourne with an honors thesis in creative writing, for which she won an RG Wilson Scholarship, her work has appeared in The RumpusThe Lifted BrowSmith JournalDumbo FeatherArtsHubThe Age and more. Things That Helped (Scribe, 2017) is her debut collection of essays, dealing with postpartum depression, gender, culture and the body.

With thanks to Muse for venue support

Feminist Lit: Then & Now

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We are thrilled to once again partner with MWF to present a special event during the festival in August.

Join Emily Maguire, Melissa Lucashenko and Natalie Kon-yu for a discussion of feminist writing past, present and future. How has feminist writing changed over time? As our understanding of intersectionality deepens, do classic texts hold up? And where to next? With chair Sophie Cunningham.

Feminist Lit: Then & Now
Saturday 26 August, 1pm
ACMI Cinema 1

Tickets available from mwf.com.au from 21 July.

FWF Round-up: January 2017

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53946e14-a332-45fa-9722-022a68f88d2f

10 Overlooked Books by Women from 2016, via LitHub

Recommended Reading

Making Art from the Outside – On LitHub, Ellena Savage ruminates on making money from art, when making art leaves one on the outside.


The Importance of Telling Women’s Stories – In this interview for the Victorian Women’s Trust, Lauren Meath talks with award-winning producer Sue Maslin (The Dressmaker) about her insider’s view of gender bias in film.

FWF Round-up: November 2016

News, Uncategorized

Women writers win big at the 2016 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards

Recommended Reading

Women writers win big at the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards – there’s lots to celebrate in this year’s PM’s Literary Awards, with loads of women receiving accolades from the office of the top job. Sally Morgan won the children’s fiction category for Sister Heart, Karen Lamb and Sheila Fitzpatrick shared the non-fiction prize, while Lisa Gorton and Charlotte Wood were awarded joint first place for the fiction category. You can read Wood’s powerful acceptance speech here.


ali-cobby-eckermann-headshotThe Place of Terrorism in Australia – in the Sydney Review of Books, Ali Cobby Eckermann asks us to look closely at prejudice against Indigenous Australians.