Neurons Firing: Meera Atkinson’s Traumata

Features, News

By Alexandra O’Sullivan

In being given the task of writing a review of Meera Atkinson’s Traumata, an exploration of trauma and its long-lasting effects, I find my thoughts reflected by Atkinson herself on the second page:

I understand you want to know what kind of book this will be and whether you can count on me. I’m thinking about how to respond.

Panic creeps into the spaces around my scribbled notes. I don’t know if I can do this book justice. I don’t know if you can count on me.

Fighting Back: The daily activism of a school librarian

Features, News

By Karys McEwen

A few years ago, I was working as the librarian at a private girls’ school in Melbourne. During Book Week, YA author Fiona Wood gave a presentation at the school assembly. Towards the end of her speech, she asked the audience of young girls and their teachers who among them considered themselves a feminist. A meagre scattering of hands appeared. Wood looked out in disbelief and asked again. This time a couple more hands crept up, the confessors shyly looking around at their peers. In total, no more than 15 feminists among a sea of 500. In my front row seat, I felt nauseous. As the librarian, I considered fostering equality as part of my role, whether through promoting books with a positive message, or providing a safe space for progressive ideas to flourish. Had I been doing enough?

More Human: Maria Tumarkin’s Axiomatic

Features, News

By Sonia Nair

In classic philosophy, an axiom is seen as a statement that is so obvious or well-established it’s routinely accepted without controversy or question. But in modern logic, an axiom is simply a premise or starting point for reasoning.

With her structurally impressive fourth nonfiction work – which tackles familiar themes from the physical and emotional significance of places that have withstood significant trauma, to the shifting conceptions of home, identity and belonging – Maria Tumarkin both demolishes this first definition and underscores the second. Blurring the lines between memoir, essay and reportage, the book’s chapters unspool from Tumarkin’s encounters with certain people, to encapsulate that ‘nothing is more human than the experience of feeling trapped’.

Say Hello: Doing Disability Activism My Own Way

Features, News

By Carly Findlay

Photo: Camille Condon

Around a year ago, I got a book deal to write a memoir. Due out early next year, Say Hello will tell my story of life with the rare, severe skin condition ichthyosis. Writing this book has been the hardest thing I’ve ever done, but not just because of the length or the subject matter. It’s because in the process of writing this book, my disability activism has been questioned.

FWF Subsidies

News

The FWF2018 Victoria program is now live. Tickets are flying out the door, but we want to make sure feminists outside of Melbourne CBD can attend – so we’re launching our regional subsidies program.

We’re offering 10 subsidies of $100 each to cover regional travel, as well as a free day pass to attend panel sessions at either of the FWF weekend days (Saturday 26 and Sunday 27 May).

We also want to ensure that financially disadvantaged writers can take part in our workshops, and so we’re offering two places for each of our workshops in Melbourne and Geelong. 

We can’t do what we do without our wonderful FWF community, including donors, so to donate to the program, please head to our GiveNow page and make a donation. Every dollar counts.

To apply for a regional subsidy or free workshop spot, fill out our simple form by 5pm Fri 20 April.

For more information contact our Development Coordinator at fwfdevelopment@gmail.com.

Family, Language, Love, Dance, Land: Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia

Features, News

By Nayuka Gorrie

Black Australia is a patchwork – there is no homogenous black culture or experience. Adequately capturing the essence of hundreds of nations is no easy feat, but Anita Heiss has pulled together an incredible bunch of voices that reflect the humour, intelligence, strength and diversity of Aboriginal people in Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia.

It’s no industry secret that readers are largely white women – the white gaze is often unavoidable. But this book wasn’t created for white dinner party fodder; it is concerned with telling the truth or many truths with nuance.